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Digital Services Act

01-10-2020

E-commerce is an essential part of the economy and of consumers shopping habits. It can support EU citizens in accessing services more easily and businesses reaching customers more targeted. The E-commerce Directive has been an important column of digital services. Still, there is need for amending the current regulation. This EAVA accompanies two European Parliament's own-initiative legislative reports by JURI and IMCO asking the Commission for legislative actions to implement a digital services ...

E-commerce is an essential part of the economy and of consumers shopping habits. It can support EU citizens in accessing services more easily and businesses reaching customers more targeted. The E-commerce Directive has been an important column of digital services. Still, there is need for amending the current regulation. This EAVA accompanies two European Parliament's own-initiative legislative reports by JURI and IMCO asking the Commission for legislative actions to implement a digital services act. The analysis identifies 22 main gaps and risks, which we clustered into four policy packages on consumer protection, content management and curation, facilitation of competition in online platforms ecosystems, and enhancement of enforcement and legal coherence. The analysis suggests that EU common action on consumer protection and e-commerce rules, as well as on a framework for content management and curation could add up €76 billion to the EU GDP between 2020-2030.

European framework on ethical aspects of artificial intelligence, robotics and related technologies

28-09-2020

The EU can become a global standard-setter in the area of artificial intelligence (AI) ethics. Common EU legislative action on ethical aspects of AI could boost the internal market and establish an important strategic advantage. While numerous public and private actors around the globe have produced ethical guidelines in this field, there is currently no comprehensive legal framework. The EU can profit from the absence of a competing global governance model and gain full 'first mover' advantages. ...

The EU can become a global standard-setter in the area of artificial intelligence (AI) ethics. Common EU legislative action on ethical aspects of AI could boost the internal market and establish an important strategic advantage. While numerous public and private actors around the globe have produced ethical guidelines in this field, there is currently no comprehensive legal framework. The EU can profit from the absence of a competing global governance model and gain full 'first mover' advantages. Building on the EU's economic and regulatory powers, common EU legislative action has great potential to provide European industry with a competitive edge. Furthermore, EU action can facilitate the adoption of EU standards globally and ensure that the development, uptake and diffusion of AI is based on the values, principles and rights protected in the EU. Those benefits cannot be achieved by actions of individual Member States. Thus, the success and benefits of EU action are contingent on the ability of the EU to take timely, common legislative action and to back this action up with strong democratic oversight, accountability and enforcement. The analyses of this European added value assessment suggest that a common EU framework on ethics has the potential to bring the European Union €294.9 billion in additional GDP and 4.6 million additional jobs by 2030.

Civil liability regime for artificial intelligence

25-09-2020

The findings of this European added value assessment (EAVA) suggest that the revision of the EU civil liability regime for artificial intelligence systems (AI) would likely generate substantial economic and social added value. The current preliminary analysis suggests that by 2030, EU action on liability could generate €54.8 billion in added value for the EU economy by stepping up the level of research and development in AI and in the range of €498.3 billion if other broader impacts, including reductions ...

The findings of this European added value assessment (EAVA) suggest that the revision of the EU civil liability regime for artificial intelligence systems (AI) would likely generate substantial economic and social added value. The current preliminary analysis suggests that by 2030, EU action on liability could generate €54.8 billion in added value for the EU economy by stepping up the level of research and development in AI and in the range of €498.3 billion if other broader impacts, including reductions in accidents, health and environmental impacts and user impacts are also taken into consideration. A clear and coherent EU civil liability regime for AI has the potential to reduce risks and increase safety, decrease legal uncertainty and related legal and litigation costs, and enhance consumer rights and trust. Those elements together could facilitate the faster and arguably safer uptake and diffusion of AI. Member States have not yet adopted specific legislation related to the regulation of liability for AI, with some exceptions related to drones, autonomous vehicles and medical AI applications. Timely action at EU level would therefore reduce regulatory fragmentation and costs for producers of AI while also helping to secure high levels of protection for fundamental and consumer rights in the EU

An EU legal framework to halt and reverse EU-driven global deforestation: European added value assessment

08-09-2020

Deforestation caused by agricultural activity is continuing at an alarming rate, threatening irreplaceable tropical forests that, among other things, are crucial for fighting climate change. The EU bears its share of responsibility for this environmental loss, as it is one of the major importers of several forest-risk commodities. To date, action has been taken at different levels to stop commodity-driven deforestation. Nevertheless, the impact on forest loss has been low as deforestation continues ...

Deforestation caused by agricultural activity is continuing at an alarming rate, threatening irreplaceable tropical forests that, among other things, are crucial for fighting climate change. The EU bears its share of responsibility for this environmental loss, as it is one of the major importers of several forest-risk commodities. To date, action has been taken at different levels to stop commodity-driven deforestation. Nevertheless, the impact on forest loss has been low as deforestation continues and new hot spots occur. There has been a recent commitment at EU level to propose new measures to minimise the risk of deforestation and forest degradation associated with products placed on the EU market. This European added value assessment (EAVA) accompanies the European Parliament's own-initiative legislative report calling on the European Commission to take legislative action on the matter. The EAVA looks at why EU action is needed and analyses four potential demand-side regulatory policy options at EU level. A quantitative analysis reveals that to varying extents, all options have the potential to reduce EU-driven deforestation and associated carbon emissions, while having a relatively small impact on the EU economy

Coronavirus and the cost of non-Europe: An analysis of the economic benefits of common European action

11-05-2020

This EPRS paper focuses on the economic benefits of common action at European level and the risk involved if the current coronavirus crisis and its aftermath were to stall or reverse the process of European integration. It attempts to quantify the losses from: (i) any gradual dismantling of the EU project - where cautious estimates suggest that erosion of the EU single market alone would cost the European economy between 3.0 and 8.7 per cent of its collective GDP (this would be existing 'European ...

This EPRS paper focuses on the economic benefits of common action at European level and the risk involved if the current coronavirus crisis and its aftermath were to stall or reverse the process of European integration. It attempts to quantify the losses from: (i) any gradual dismantling of the EU project - where cautious estimates suggest that erosion of the EU single market alone would cost the European economy between 3.0 and 8.7 per cent of its collective GDP (this would be existing 'European added value' permanently lost); and (ii) a parallel failure to take advantage of the unexploited potential of collective public goods that have yet be achieved (this would be future GDP growth foregone). The latter 'cost of non-Europe' in 50 policy areas was identified by EPRS in 2019 as around 14 per cent of EU GDP by the end of a ten-year running-in period.

Common minimum standards of civil procedure: European Added Value Assessment

28-11-2019

The European Added Value Assessment (EAVA) estimates whether and to what extent adoption of EU minimum standards of civil procedure could generate European added value. The European added value is quantified as a percentage reduction of the total cost of civil procedure. The total cost of civil procedure is estimated based on data on the number of civil and commercial proceedings in the EU-28 and the cost of litigation in the Member States. Based on this analysis, the EAVA estimates that introducing ...

The European Added Value Assessment (EAVA) estimates whether and to what extent adoption of EU minimum standards of civil procedure could generate European added value. The European added value is quantified as a percentage reduction of the total cost of civil procedure. The total cost of civil procedure is estimated based on data on the number of civil and commercial proceedings in the EU-28 and the cost of litigation in the Member States. Based on this analysis, the EAVA estimates that introducing EU common minimum standards of civil procedure could reduce annual costs for citizens and businesses in the European Union by as much as €4.7 to 7.9 billion per annum. The European added value could be potentially generated through reduction of fragmentation, simplification and filling gaps in the current EU procedural rules. Furthermore, EU common minimum standards would contribute towards building mutual trust between judicial authorities of different Member States. Increasing trust has the potential to enhance legal certainty and stability for citizens and businesses, further reduce uncertainty and delay costs.

Expedited settlement of commercial disputes in the European Union

05-12-2018

The EU legal services market is the second largest in the world. Commercial, business to business (B2B) litigation is one of the largest segments of the legal services market. The EU measures on choice of law, choice of forum and enforcement proved to be successful in supporting EU competitiveness. However, to enhance competitiveness of the EU litigation market and ensure further growth, a set of EU measures to simplify and expedite settlement of commercial disputes is needed. The EU measures should ...

The EU legal services market is the second largest in the world. Commercial, business to business (B2B) litigation is one of the largest segments of the legal services market. The EU measures on choice of law, choice of forum and enforcement proved to be successful in supporting EU competitiveness. However, to enhance competitiveness of the EU litigation market and ensure further growth, a set of EU measures to simplify and expedite settlement of commercial disputes is needed. The EU measures should focus on the enhancement of procedural efficiency, among other things, by taking action to reduce length of procedure. The 2018 European Added Value Assessment (EAVA) suggests that the EU actions to expedite settlement of commercial disputes could generate European added value for the EU economy and businesses in the range of 4.6 to 5.7 billion EUR annually. The European added value can be created through increase in direct contribution of litigation services revenues to the EU economy and through reduction of opportunity costs to business associated with length of judicial proceedings.

EU law for an open independent and efficient European administration

27-07-2018

The results of the public consultation clearly suggest - EU citizens want action. Citizens call for an action that wold turn their EU right to good administration into solution. The workable and enforceable solution that adds value. Europe needs innovation! Innovation not only in tools and technologies but also in how EU governs itself.

The results of the public consultation clearly suggest - EU citizens want action. Citizens call for an action that wold turn their EU right to good administration into solution. The workable and enforceable solution that adds value. Europe needs innovation! Innovation not only in tools and technologies but also in how EU governs itself.

A common EU approach to liability rules and insurance for connected and autonomous vehicles

28-02-2018

This assessment of European added value finds that revision of the EU's current legislative framework is necessary, notably as regards the regulation of civil liability and insurance. Quantitative assessment of added value, at the current stage of technological development, proved difficult and inconclusive. A qualitative analysis, however, provided evidence that action at EU level would (i) promote legal certainty; (ii) reduce the transaction costs for car manufacturers and public administrations ...

This assessment of European added value finds that revision of the EU's current legislative framework is necessary, notably as regards the regulation of civil liability and insurance. Quantitative assessment of added value, at the current stage of technological development, proved difficult and inconclusive. A qualitative analysis, however, provided evidence that action at EU level would (i) promote legal certainty; (ii) reduce the transaction costs for car manufacturers and public administrations arising from differences in national liability rules and systems for the determination and calculation of damages; and (iii) secure effective consumer protection.

Cross-border recognition of adoptions

30-11-2016

The European Added Value Assessment (EAVA) presents a qualitative analysis of possible policy options and quantitative estimates on the possible additional value of taking legislative action on the EU level related to cross-border recognition of adoptions.The EAVA identifies economic and social costs, and notably the costs related to the incomplete protection of rights of mobile EU citizens, which are born as a result of the absence of regulation on automatic recognition of adoption decisions at ...

The European Added Value Assessment (EAVA) presents a qualitative analysis of possible policy options and quantitative estimates on the possible additional value of taking legislative action on the EU level related to cross-border recognition of adoptions.The EAVA identifies economic and social costs, and notably the costs related to the incomplete protection of rights of mobile EU citizens, which are born as a result of the absence of regulation on automatic recognition of adoption decisions at the EU level. The substantive scope of the EAVA is limited to the issues related to the recognition of adoptions in EU Member States. The substantive family law issues, as well as issues related to the recognition of convention adoptions, within the meaning of the 1993 Hague Convention on Intercountry adoptions, are not covered in this assessment.  

Avvenimenti fil-ġejjieni

26-10-2020
European Gender Equality Week - October 26-29, 2020
Avveniment ieħor -
FEMM TRAN LIBE BECA AIDA INTA CULT EMPL DROI SEDE DEVE
26-10-2020
Joint LIBE - FEMM Hearing on Trafficking in human beings
Smigħ -
LIBE FEMM
27-10-2020
Hearing on Rebuilding fish stocks in the Mediterranean: next steps
Smigħ -
PECH

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